Frank Corcoran

irish composer

POST MIDNIGHT OILY MUSINGS NOW BEFORE DAWN SNEAKS UP THE GARDEN

Music is largely metaphor.

My music is a metaphor for what ?

I take my newest CHOIR FOR MY FUNERAL . Of course a great title. Ignore for a moment it and its text ( “Requiem aeternam dona ei , Domine . Amen ” ) and its dative singular and its echo of so much choral music of the past…

Hear it maybe like this : it begins ; it ascends; descent and dies.

Music is a metaphor . Sung music, the human breath, phrases and lines and harmonies and their rhythms. Sure, it also maps expressive states or jumps or emotional black-and-white or the divine spark or whatnot.
What about my new String Quartet ( for 2019 ) ? Or my Clarinet Quintet ( ditto ) ?
Blown and bowed.

Hmmm. Explore all this further. First get some sleep before those rosy fingers
….

A STARTLING NEW FRANK CORCORAN / RTE CD

RHAPSODIC CELLI – The Music Of Frank Corcoran

RTE Lyric fm

Martin Johnson, Cello – RTE National Symphony Orchestra , Gavin Maloney, conductor.

1-4. Cello Concerto 32.21

5. Rhapsodietta Joyceana 3.31

6. Rhapsodic Bowing for 8 Celli 8.42

7-15. Duetti Irlandesi for Cello and Piano 23.43

HIGH MUSICAL JINKS AT JULY 14 ORVIETO CORCORAN CONCERT

—–Original Message—–
From: Ufficio Promozione To: Fbcorcoran
Sent: Tue, Jul 10, 2018 10:33 am
Subject: Concerto di Dublino rassegna stampa

Buongiorno Maestro Corcoran,
ecco alcuni link della rassegna stampa del Concerto di Dublino:

http://www.orvietonews.it/cultura/2018/07/09/il-concerto-di-dublino-al-ridotto-del-mancinelli-e-al-piccolo-teatro-cavour-63270.html

Al Teatro Mancinelli va in scena “Il concerto di Dublino” col maestro Frank Corcoran

http://www.comune.orvieto.tr.it/notizie/al-mancinelli-il-concerto-di-dublino-del-maestro-f

Al teatro Mancinelli di Orvieto le note della musica classica irlandese e italiana

Un altro articolo lo trova in allegato.

Saluti

FRANK CORCORAN BORN IN BORRISOKANE. KILLAVALLA HOUSE I MOURN

I was born on Main Street, Borrisokane . 1954 our family moved out to Killavalla House.

Estate: Stoney (Co Tipperary) Killavalla House, Borrisokane . I see it in my mind’s eye and WEEP NOW ! !

Thomas Stoney from Yorkshire came to Ireland in the late 17th century and settled in county Tipperary. In 1745, his eldest son, George of Greyfort and Portland, married Eliza, daughter of Captain James Johnston of Ballynockane and sister of Captain Robert Johnston of Emell Castle. They had five sons, Andrew died without male heirs, Thomas of Arran Hill and Emell Castle, James J. of Oakley Park, Bigoe A. of Killavalla and George who had no children. The second son, Thomas Stoney and his wife Ruth Falkiner of Mount Falcon, had eight sons including George of Kyle Park, Richard of Portland and James Johnstone of Emell Castle.
In the mid 19th century most of the Stoney lands were in the barony of Lower Ormond, parishes of Borrisokane, Lorrha, Modreeny, Nenagh and Uskane. In the 1870s Johnston Stoney of Emill Castle owned 473 acres in King’s County (Offaly) and 104 acres in county Tipperary.
Other members of the Stoney family namely Sadlier Stoney of Ballycapple, Cloghjordan, owned 953 acres, Thomas Stoney of Kyle Park owned 1,029 acres, Thomas B. Stoney of Portland Park owned 2,778 acres and Thomas G. Stoney of Kingstown owned 221 acres, all in county Tipperary.
Members of this family were prominent in the scientific, engineering and academic fields in nineteenth century Ireland.

House Name / Description Townland Civil Parish PLU DED Barony County Map Ref image Killavalla (H4445)
Lewis records Killavalla as the seat of R. Johnston Stoney.

The Ordnance Survey Name Books refer to the house in this townland as “Honeywood House, the residence of Robert Johnstone Stoney, very commodious with convenient offices attached”. Stoney’s representatives held the property valued at £16+ from the representatives of Stephen Egan at the time of Griffith’s Valuation.
It later became the seat of the Saunders family.
This house no longer exists.
Killavalla Borrisokane Borrisokane Lower Ormond Tipperary

2016 FRANK CORCORAN AND SCHUBERT’S GREAT STRING QUINTET ON NDR

NORDDEUTSCHER RUNDFUNK
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RADIOTIPPS
Sonnabend,
SENDEWOCHE 49
3. Dezember
Nachtrag zu Woche 48
Prisma Musik
Thema: Kleine Schule des musikalischen Hörens: Frank Corcoran hört das Streichquintett C-Dur von Franz Schubert
Das Werk gehört zu seinen letzten und gilt Kennern als Gipfel dessen, was in dieser Kunst überhaupt möglich ist. Generationen haben sich den Kopf darüber zerbrochen, wie Schubert zum Beispiel die magische Stimmung des Adagio-Satzes erzeugt hat.
Der irische Komponist Frank Corcoran versucht in der Kleinen Schule des musikalischen Hörens den Geheimnissen dieser Musik auf die Spur zu kommen, die einem unbegreiflichen Schaffensrausch auf dem Kranken- und schließlich Sterbebett entsprang.

Danach Frank Corcorans 4. Sinfonie aus dem Jahre 1996
( National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland, Cond, Colman Pearce )

FRANK CORCORAN CHORAL

THE MORNINGTON SINGERS

21: anniversary concert

23 June 2018 – Trinity College Chapel, Dublin
Orla Flanagan, conductor

2018 marks the 21st anniversary of Mornington Singers. We celebrated this milestone and our twenty-one year history with a concert featuring some of our favourite music from over the years, and were delighted to have a number of our former members join us in an encore.

William Byrd: Sing joyfully
Colin Mawby: Alleluia, Christus resurrexit
Rhona Clarke: Regina coeli
Frank Corcoran: Caoine
James MacMillan: The gallant weaver
Hubert Parry: There is an old belief
John Buckley: Jabberwocky
Seán Doherty: Under-Song
Selga Mence: Kale?js kala debes?s
Felix Mendelssohn: Richte mich, Gott
Jaakko Mäntyjärvi: Pseudo-yoik

Enduring Fictions: Celebrating The Long Gaze Back

5 April 2018 – Regent House, Trinity College Dublin
Orla Flanagan, conductor

The choir featured in an evening of readings and music from The Long Gaze Back, an anthology of short stories by 30 Irish women writers and the Dublin: One City One Book choice for 2018.

Frank Corcoran: Caoine
Seán Doherty: Under-Song
Éna Brennan: L’Étranger
Caitríona Ní Dhubhghaill: An raibh tú ar an gcarraig?

2016

Rhona Clarke (b. 1958): Regina coeli
Eoghan Desmond (b. 1989): Oh, most merciful!
Colin Mawby (b. 1936): Alleluia, Christus resurrexit
Ben Hanlon (b. 1952): World War I Letters (first performance)
Mark Armstrong (b. 1963): Dreaming
Seán Doherty (b. 1987): Under-Song
Éna Brennan (b. 1990): L’Étranger
John Buckley (b. 1951): To the Northeast (first performance)
Caitríona Ní Dhubhghaill (b. 1975): An raibh tú ar an gcarraig?
Frank Corcoran (b. 1944): Caoine

FRANK CORCORAN PREMIERES IN JULY 2018

14.7.2018 Teatro Mancinelli Orvieto FRANK CORCORAN ” Hot Dialogues ” for Viola and Pianoforte

Duo Pratoleva

and Christopher Corcoran ” Deep Blue Windows ” ”

15.7.2018 Piccolo Teatro Cavour Bolsena SAME PROGRAMME

Exciting new chamber works. New sound-visions . New compositional courage….

HUGH LANE GALLERY DUBLIN CORCORAN CONCERT 4. JUNE 2017

Pratoleva Trio HUGH LANE GALLERY DUBLIN

Programme

4th June 2017, 12noon

1. Frank Corcoran: “Duetti Irlandesi” for violoncello & pianoforte Irish Premiere
i) “Im Aonar seal”
ii) “A Mhairin De Barra”

2. Frank Corcoran: “Variazioni semplici” for Solo Viola

3. Frank Corcoran: “Rhapsodietta Joyceana” for Solo Cello

4. Interview with Evonne Fergusson (Director CMC) and Frank Corcoran

5. Frank Corcoran: “Duetti Irlandesi” for violoncello & pianoforte
iii) “Séan Ó Duibhir An Ghleanna”
iv) “Mo Roísín Dubh”

6. Frank Corcoran: “Trio” for viola, violoncello and pianoforte Irish Premiere

Total length c.45mins

Performers:

Fergal Caulfield: pianoforte
Adèle Johnson: viola
Martin Johnson: violoncello

2. 3. 1994 THE INDEPENDENT

MICHAEL DERVAN
Wednesday 2 March 1994 01:02
0 comments

The Independent Culture

Since 1991, which saw the demise of the Accents festival, Dublin has been without a showcase for the work of

contemporary composers. The extraordinary decision by the national broadcasting service, RTE, to include just one

work by a living Irish composer in the 1993 subscription series of the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) provoked

such a public furore that a palliative of some sort was bound to be offered in due course. It materialised at the

end of February as a 10-day ‘celebration of new Irish music’ under the billing Music Now.

Sadly, the programming professed no theme or focus, and in the absence of work by the likes of Gerald Barry,

Frank Corcoran and Paul Hayes, the most discernible trend was towards conservatism.

NOV. 30 2000 FRANK CORCORAN DIRECTOR OF SLIGO NEW MUSIC ! WOW !

Stretching horizons was festival high note IRISH TIMES

Thu, Nov 30, 2000, 00:00

Frank Corcoran, director and guest composer of this year’s festival of contemporary music in Sligo,
seeks to disturb musical horizons; the new becomes the old and the old becomes the new,
a concept he has enshrined in a new word, “Seannua”.
This coinage (containing the Irish for old and new) he frequently brought to the attention of the audiences, but it was most vividly illustrated in the Vogler String Quartet’s concert: after Webern’s compact and painfully compressed Op.5, Ian Wilson’s nightmarish Wander darkling (written this year), Stravinsky’s stark Three Pieces and Wolfgang Rihm’s Quartet No.1 (written in 1970 and struggling to combine profundity with comprehensibility), Haydn’s Op.76 No.4 (Sunrise), unquestionably odd!

A lunchtime recital with Judith Mok (soprano), Colm O’Donnell (seannos) and Gabriel Rosenstock (reader), illustrated variously the capabilities of the human voice. The most recent work, John Buckley’s I am wind on sea (an early Irish text in his own translation) produced sounds of jarring primitivism that have been abandoned for the most part by western musicians; accompanied only by her own percussion (cymbals and wood blocks), Judith Mok could have been a visitor from Outer Mongolia.

In strong contrast was the gentle and tuneful mouth-music of Colm O’Donnell.
Rosenstock read some of his own haiku with warm feeling and engaging clarity and also provided the texts (in Irish)
for Corcoran’s Cuig luric. In these, the soprano was accompanied by the Mostly Modern Piano Trio and the composer used the words as springboards for elaborate inventions.

Although Saturday night’s concert contained Ligeti’s Six Pieces for Wind Quartet, Benjamin Dwyer Crow’s Vanity (a musical expression of understanding, if not of empathy, with Ted Hughes’s malicious and malignant bird of prey, written for cello and tape) and Donncha Dennehy’s Metropolis Mutabilis for tape solo (this was an apotheosis of traffic noises that might have been called “Dublin, the song of a great city”),
it was Corcoran’s night.

His Buile Shuibhne, a setting of Seamus Heaney’s translation, in which the composer was the impassioned reciter, accompanied by principals of the NSO and conducted by David Brophy, had a Shakespearian intensity that was reminiscent of King Lear. The four winds and the four strings and the percussion, now together, now at cross purposes, played as if their lives depended on it.

Equally committed was the RIAM Percussion Ensemble in Music From the Book of Kells and Goirt a’ Bhroin/ Trauerfelder.

Corcoran uses percussion in a subtle way, not relying too much on staccato rhythms; Goirt a’ Bhroin was both tocsin and knell, dirge and curfew, making its point by reticence and not overstatement.

Also in the concert was Corcoran’s new Wind Quintet (his third), recently commissioned by the Arts Council and played by the Daedalus Quintet.
Sweeney’s Winderies is its subtitle;
the composer writes: “It is in no sense programmatic. It is wind . . .”
An uncomfortable work, raw like a wound that still oozes, this was its first performance anywhere.
The other works, though performed abroad, have had to wait till now for a public performance in Ireland.

This festival, in the welcoming ambience of the Model Arts and Niland Gallery, makes some amends for the neglect. Yet another work, Lines and Figurations for bass-clarinet and marimba, was performed on Sunday, flanked by Concerto for Violin and Percussion by Lou Harrison and Concerto for Flute and Percussion by A. Joliver.
Richard O’Donnell conducted the RIAM Ensemble and principals of the NSO in these piquant blends of the oriental and classical.